NEWS & EVENTS
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Recipients of the Boyd Fund for Undergraduate Scholarship
  • The Boyd Fund for Undergraduate Scholarship was established in fall 2011 to promote broadly defined scholarship among Capital University students.  These funds, administered by the Office of the Provost, support Capital students’ scholarship projects that lead to dissemination, such as presentations at the Symposium on Undergraduate Scholarship and publication in Epistimi, Capital’s undergraduate research journal, or ReCap, Capital’s literary journal. 

        

    Summer and Fall 2014 Boyd Fund Awards 

    Rachel Baran (mentored by Kathryn Bell, Stephanie Gray Wilson) will use eye-tracking methods to develop a more fine-grained analysis of how individuals with and without a childhood abuse history attend to and perceive threatening facial expressions.

    David Butler (mentored by Stephanie Sounders) will study the history, processes, and challenges of the developing organization Estibrawpa, a grassroots, woman-based community in Yorkin, Costa Rica that is looking to improve the quality of their economy. From this study, David will collaborate in the development of a “how to” manual to document the group’s success in the creation of the organization; the manual will be suitable for dissemination to other indigenous groups with suffering economies.

    Carly Moss (mentored by Terry Lahm) will map and illustrate the extent and location of the Illinoian age outwash on Capital University’s Primmer property. The map will allow future Capital University students to better understand the impact of glacial activity during the last continental glaciation in Ohio, provide insight into the extent of the porosity and permeability of these outwash materials, and identify the impact of these glacial materials on the formation of groundwater springs that supply water to the 15 acre wetland that exists on the Primmer property.

    Emma Mulvaney (mentored by Alan Stam) will examine the relationship between the Bribri people in Costa Rica and their land. Using a “self-anthropology” method in which community members describe and portray the complex relationship between their lives and the land, Emma will depict the life-and-land relationship in the rainforest of Costa Rica.

    Lindy Newman (mentored by Terry Lahm) will implant six temperature data loggers on Capital University’s Primmer property within shallow portions of the spring and associated streams to measure temperature fluctuations through portions of the summer. Using temperature loggers along with measurements of hydraulic head (a measurement that combines water elevation and pressure provided by piezometers), this research will provide a rough picture of how much water is exchanged between the stream and the underlying water table.

    Melissa Sandt (mentored by Alan Stam) will study the history, processes, and challenges of the developing organization Estibrawpa, a grassroots, woman-based community in Yorkin, Costa Rica that is looking to improve the quality of their economy. From this study, Melissa will collaborate to develop a “how to” manual to document the group’s success in the creation of the organization; the manual will be suitable for dissemination to other indigenous groups with suffering economies.

    Lynn Tancak, Matt Lewis, Josh Vanderzyden, Samantha Wentz, Carmella App, Daniel Stemen, Oliver Rouch (mentored by Betsy Pike) will develop four short narrative training videos for the Columbus Division of Police. Each video will contain a main point-of-view (POV) of a detective first arriving at a crime scene as well as scripted interviews with eyewitnesses, victims, and responding officers.

    Abbey Zacharias (mentored by Sherry Mong) will investigate college students’ knowledge and perceptions of crime in order to answer the following research questions: Do students believe crime myths? Do students rate their knowledge of crime accurately? What are students’ sources of information on crime? Are students afraid of crime?


    Spring 2014 Boyd Fund Awards


    Emma Chad (mentored by Andrea M. Karkowski) will collect longitudinal data about students’ level of stress, perceived sources of stress, and mental health during a semester and then use the data to develop a computational model of how students’ level of stress, sources of stress, and mental health vary across the semester. This model could be used by college faculty and student life personnel to develop strategies and interventions that help students manage their stress, which could lead to greater academic achievement and persistence through to graduation.

    Jonathan Lucas (mentored by Chad Loughrige) will develop a prototype of a new and improved riser system to be used by stage performers.

    Nathaniel Powell (mentored by Suzanne Marilley) will examine former President Richard Nixon’s concept, “The Silent Majority,” and the extent to which he used it as an heuristic device versus as a description of empirical electoral reality.


     Summer and Fall 2013 Boyd Fund Awards 

    Ashleigh Bope (mentored by Christine Anderson) will establish a new research site at the Clear Creek Metro Park in southeastern Ohio and conduct a population survey of the adaptive rodent species Peromyscus leucopus. The data collected at Clear Creek Metro Park will be compared to a previously established site at the Primmer Outdoor Learning Center in nearby Logan, Ohio, in order to better understand the overall population dynamics of P. leucopus in SE Ohio. 

    Ejiela Agi (mentored by Tianshu Wang) will examine the pedagogical advantages of implementing improvisation into piano study, with a focus on improvisation in the classical genre (e.g., Bach, Beethoven).  The research will serve as the basis of a long term goal to develop a teaching method for classical improvisation.

    Jess Cogan (mentored by Terry Lahm) will assess of the effects of acid mine drainage on watersheds and surrounding habitats and progress on reclamation efforts. He will use the results to inform the efficacy of reclamation efforts as compared to untreated acid mine drainage sites.

    Hannah Spacek (mentored by Justin Dials) will investigate the impact of positive family history of diabetes in obese individuals on heart rate recovery.  Her research is one of three student pilot studies whose data will be used to develop a larger research project that will explore the effect of exercise training on heart rate recovery in the above-mentioned populations.

    Chris Colatruglio (mentored by Justin Dials) will investigate the impact of positive family history of diabetes in obese individuals on heart rate recovery.  His research is one of three student pilot studies whose data will be used to develop a larger research project that will explore the effect of exercise training on heart rate recovery in the above-mentioned populations.

    Kristina Buena (mentored by Justin Dials) will investigate the impact of positive family history of diabetes in obese individuals on heart rate recovery.  Her research is one of three student pilot studies whose data will be used to develop a larger research project that will explore the effect of exercise training on heart rate recovery in the above-mentioned populations.


    Spring 2013 Boyd Fund Awards 

    Luke Bowers (mentored by Kathryn Bell) was awarded funding in order to study the emotional reactions to negative alcohol-related consequences of college students and its impact on students’ future decisions to engage in heavy alcohol use.

    Melanie DeArdo (mentored by Jill Kilanowski) will conduct focus groups that will address the needs college students who have a sibling with a genetic disease. The outcome will produce standards for support by both hospital nurses and by Capital University for college-aged siblings of genetic disorder sufferers.

    Jessica DeBelly and Kashmere Pearson (mentored by Kerry Cheesman) received funding in order to assess the percentage of commercially available popcorn that is genetically modified.

    Cameron Girard (mentored by Mark Lochstampfor and Pat Shields) will perform an acoustic assessment of Capital University’s Mezzanine. He will use the results to formulate an acoustic treatment plan of the space and present those results to Capital’s Audio Engineering Society and our Facilities Division.

    Eric Heuer (mentored by Justin Dials) will look at the effects of aerobic exercise on resistance weight training in non-athletic college males with and without protein supplementation.  His research is a pilot study that will be used to explore long-term the effects of aerobic exercise on resistance weight training.

    Mark Ivey and Jessica Pohlman (mentored by Kimberly Heym) are using their funding to purchase a license for images to be used in a study of the cognitive demands of processing pictures, words, and sounds in working memory.

    Katalin Millinger (mentored by Christine Anderson) will collect baseline data on population attributes of small mammals at the Primmer Property in order to study the effects of habitat change on the mammals as the Primmer Outdoor Learning Center is converted from old fields and pastureland to prairies. 

    Patrick Overturf (mentored by Robert Breitaupt) will travel to Chicago in order to consult with a Vibraphone expert, as well as visit the Percussive Arts Society’s Rhythm Discovery Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. The result of his project will be a comprehensive guide to the history of the vibraphone. 

    Anthony Valenti (mentored by Justin Dials) will examine the effects of aerobic exercise on resistance weight training in male college athletes. His research is also part of a study that will be used to explore long-term the effects of aerobic exercise on resistance weight training.

    Ariel Webb (mentored by Catherine Boulant and Paula Federico) will use software to build a computational model of insulin release by the pancreas. The model can be used to reflect insulin release in individuals who are glucose-intolerant and those with Type 2 Diabetes.


    Summer and Fall 2012 Boyd Fund Awards  

    Megan Boissiere (mentored by Andrew Carlson) will analyze women’s perceived rights versus given rights in urban and rural Ethiopian women.  She will use the results to create methods of helping the women exercise their rights using practical applications.

    Breanna Hayes (mentored by Christine Anderson) will conduct a population survey of amphibians in Central Ohio and testing their infection rate of the fungal disease Bd, a disease which is believed to be the cause of massive declines in amphibian populations worldwide.

    Cole Musial (mentored by Terry Lahm) will create a water budget for the Primmer Outdoor Learning Center, a large portion of which contains a wetland, and will quantify the inflow and outflow of water on the property. Using these data, he will create a hydrologic model of the wetland’s yearly water cycle.

    Ashley Taylor (mentored by Sabato Sagaria) plans to study the link between spinal injuries and affected persons’ mental states.

    Christophe Valcourt (mentored by Steven Drewry) will conduct research in the Near East Side of Columbus in order to study the history of poor urban neighborhoods and the factors which led them to go into decline. By understanding the history, he hopes to better address the concerns of current-day residents. 


    Spring 2012 Boyd Fund Awards  

    Michael Austin (mentored by Andrew Carlson) will perform a comparative analysis of community gardening project in Columbus, Ohio and Dabat, Ethiopia.  Through this work Michael will gain a better understanding of community organization and promotion of nutrition in various populations.

    Sarah Beinkampen (mentored by Stephanie Gray Wilson) will study student use of technology and its effect on working memory capacity.  The results will add to the understanding of the relationship between technology use and human mental processing.

    Michael Burgess (mentored by Kerry Cheesman) received funding in order to study the inhibition of the aromatase enzyme by ingested polyphenols. Inhibition of aromatase has been the target of breast cancer research, and this research will shed light on the use of commercially available polyphenols in order to inhibit aromatase.

    Justin Damron, Caitlin Bierman, Caitlin Harville, Leanne Howard, Jazmin Soto, and Taylor Neimira (mentored by Andrea M. Karkowski) in conjunction with CHLOE, Inc., a non-profit, Columbus-based organization focused on empowering young single mothers, plan to assess the needs of single mothers. Results from this study will be used to inform programming and services for single mothers. 

    Alexandra Marinelli (mentored by Heather Janiszewski Goodin) received funding in order to explore the use of medical line wraps for children receiving treatment in home healthcare settings. Alexandra will use the results of her study to make recommendations as to the use of medical line wraps for all at-risk patients in pediatric home health care