NEWS & EVENTS
Management, 2010
  • Management, 2010

     

     

    Operations Management for a Nonprofit Start-up Company
    Kathryn Bluher
    Mentor: M. Ali Ülkü

    Recent research reports that one in four college women have survived rape or an attempted rape; this finding prompted a need for increased awareness against sexual violence and abuse. In evaluation of the need, we developed a new mathematical model for a nonprofit start-up company that introduces a product designed to increase awareness, hence combating violence against women. Employing operations management techniques, we provide an innovative probabilistic demand model that incorporates the effects of selling price and advertising efforts and the effect of the intent to help a cause. With the objective of maximizing the probability of survival, we cast a nonlinear programming problem that solves for optimal prices and reinvestments. The planning horizon of our model reflects the behavior of the product life cycle. Therefore, our model aligns with and aids in the execution of small-business plans to enhance operational efficiency. We offer analytical findings that come with our model and managerial insights about the key parameters that have an impact in the sustainability of start-up companies, especially for those which are founded for a good cause. We proposed a new analytical operating model that helps to increase societal awareness to stop sexual violence against women.

     

     

    Accounting Internship Experience
    Alyss Carpenter, Luke Boggs, Tatjana Taleff
    Mentor: Steve Mellum

    The accounting internship program is a professional field experience available to senior accounting majors in the School of Management and Leadership. For a period of ten to eleven weeks we took on full-time entry-level employment responsibilities. These responsibilities were designed to introduce us to an accounting organization’s day-to-day operations and required us to apply accounting theory to practice. As a result of this program we were able to gain valuable work experience, guidance and direction for career planning, develop strong work habits, and create a portfolio displaying our professional accomplishments. Past internship sponsors have reported how valuable the program has been to their organization and the support of their clients. We describe the entire internship process that we experienced, from the interview process to the exit interview on our last day on the job. The organizations we worked with during our internship program were local Certified Public Accounting firms.

     

     

    Accounting Internship Experience
    Brenda Denlinger, Chas Manning, Chelsea Ruoff
    Mentor: Steve Mellum

    The accounting internship program is a professional field experience available to senior accounting majors in the School of Management and Leadership. For a period of ten to eleven weeks we performed full-time entry-level employment responsibilities at local Certified Public Accounting firms. These responsibilities were designed to introduce us to an accounting organization’s day-to-day operations and required us to apply accounting theory. As a result of this program we gained valuable work experience and guidance and direction for career planning. We also developed strong work habits and created a portfolio displaying our professional accomplishments. Past internship sponsors have reported how valuable the program has been to their organization and the support of their clients. We describe the entire internship process that we experienced, from the interview process to the exit interview on our last day on the job.

     

     

    Spain, European Monetary Union, and Deregulation
    Coleman Drake
    Mentor: Stephen Baker

    This paper reviews whether or not the process of European monetary integration in Spain has prompted the introduction of structural reforms. Structural reforms are defined by Ardagna et al. (2008) as deregulation in the product markets and liberalization and deregulation in the labor markets. After reviewing the theoretical arguments that may link European monetary integration and structural reforms, I provide a history of the two decades leading up to Spain adopting the Euro. My findings show that integration prompted reforms in the product market, but labor reforms have not moved forward in the Spanish economy. I identify remaining structural problems and prescribe the continued use and expansion of temporary contracts as a means to continue structural reform in Spain.

     

     

    An Analysis of Executive Compensation and Its Effects on Bank Performance
    Sean T. Malone
    Mentor: Saurav Roychoudhury

    I investigate the relationship between senior managerial compensation in a bank and the bank’s performance, as related to the value it has created for its shareholders as well accounting profits. My study is relevant in the present economic environment where there is continuing debate about the senior managerial compensation in a bank related to performance. This study uses data on executive compensation for CEO/CFO of banks, firm level accounting and financial data to explore a potential relationship between compensation and bank profitability. Specifically, I ask whether there is a causal linkage between higher managerial compensation and future bank performance. A multivariate regression analysis is used to determine the potential effect of managerial compensation on firm performance. Variables in the compensation set include salary, bonus, and employee stock options. Key profitability ratios and market value measures profitability of the banks. I control for other variables like bank size, year effects and other bank characteristics. My findings contribute to the literature on managerial performance and compensation. I discuss how compensation can be configured in order to aid bank performance.

     

     

    An Economic Analysis of Japan in the 1990s: The Lost Decade
    Bethany Rowles
    Mentors: Michael Yosha, Stephen Baker

    The 1990s in Japan experienced widespread economic downturn which left the country in a period of stagnation and deflation known as the Lost Decade. The policy decisions and instability of certain financial sectors at the time played a part in the initial downturn and in the length of recovery. In this research project, I examined the factors that led to this downturn and what occurred as a result. I studied the economics of the Lost Decade as well as the preceding time period, the world economics of the time, and the internal cultural, administrative, and labor changes which were occurring. The effects of the economic crisis and the policies enacted were also considered, as well as the eventual recovery and lasting results. Many factors contributed to the fall of Japan’s economy. Japan has a bank-based financial system, which amplified the bursting of the asset-price bubble. The liquidity trap that occurred from cutting interest rates left monetary policy ineffective. It would have been difficult to know that an asset price bubble was occurring during the 1980s. Although it may have been possible to lessen the effects, it is unlikely that what happened could have been completely prevented.